New AAA Foundation study reveals the dangers of getting less than seven hours of sleep

Drivers who miss between one to two hours of the recommended seven hours of sleep in a 24-hour period nearly double their risk for a crash, according to new research from the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that 35 percent of U.S. drivers sleep less than the recommended seven hours daily. And with drowsy driving involved in more than one in five fatal crashes on U.S. roadways each year, AAA warns drivers that getting less than seven hours of sleep may have deadly consequences.

“You cannot miss sleep and still expect to be able to safely function behind the wheel,” said Dr. David Yang, executive director for the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. “Our new research shows that a driver who has slept for less than five hours has a crash risk comparable to someone driving drunk.” More info: http://newsroom.aaa.com/2016/12/missing-1-2-hours-sleep-doubles-crash-risk/

A 2012 study by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety found that younger drivers are more likely to drive while drowsy. The survey found one in seven licensed drivers ages 16-24 admitted to having nodded off at least once while driving in the past year as compared to one in ten of all licensed drivers who confessed to falling asleep during the same period. More info: http://newsroom.aaa.com/2012/11/young-drivers-admit-to-nodding-off-behind-the-wheel/

News from the Montana Traffic Education Association

Visit MTEAOnline.org where you can learn about the many benefits of membership in the Montana Traffic Education Association and read the Fall and Winter 2016 newsletters (and back issues). If you are not a member of MTEA, consider joining the professional association of Montana's traffic educators and traffic safety experts. Founded in 1967, MTEA will celebrate its 50th Anniversary at the MTEA/OPI traffic education conference in Great Falls, April 23-25, 2017. MTEA is also on Facebook!

Wishing you and yours a warm, safe, rested, and joyous holiday season!

Visit the webpage of the Traffic Education Office. Contact us at (406) 444-4432 or email Patti at pborneman@mt.gov or Fran at fpenner-ray@mt.gov.